The outcomes from the Living Heritage Grants Program are revealed with the release of new videos and completed project summaries showcasing what the funded heritage conservation works mean for local communities.

The outcomes from the Living Heritage Grants Program are revealed with the release of new videos and completed project summaries showcasing what the funded heritage conservation works mean for local communities.

Since the launch of the program in 2016, more than ninety projects have been funded across the state, from avenues of honour to windmill farms, from Dimboola to Omeo, the projects showcase Victoria’s rich and diverse heritage. The Living Heritage Grants Program supports the conservation of ‘at risk’ places so they can be enjoyed by current and future generations.

Many projects have now finished and completed project summaries have been prepared which highlight the outcomes of the conservation works and documentation projects. Conservation works enable heritage places to be re-activated and re-imagined into vibrant community spaces and the grants are seen as an investment in the community itself. The community benefits achieved through the projects include increased visitation, investment in traditional trades and skills, and an increased sense of pride in our local heritage.

Several videos have been released which highlight the goals of the projects and the skills and dedication of the community, heritage tradespeople and skilled professionals working on site. The videos showcase works in progress and detail the practical challenges and rewards of working with significant heritage places.

The history of the Victorian Heritage Register listed Benalla Migrant Camp is showcased in a video about conservation planning for the former 1949 RAAF base and migrant camp site, which illuminated the experiences of those who lived there. A video for the historic St Mark’s Anglican Church in Camberwell reveals the logistical challenges of replacing 144 deteriorated concrete louvres weighing some 45 kilos each, in a church spire which reaches 22 metres in height. The story of the conservation of the Quercus Methodist Church, Beechworth is told by Judith Doughty, Quercus Beechworth manager, who details the many community events and functions held in the building and what the restoration will mean for the community.

Watch the completed projects videos

Read more about their stories